Getting Started


This guide is made specifically for visitors who wish to play War of the Fanboys in their own homes. The guide travels from easiest to most difficult, so it jumps around some.

Prerequisites:


Risk 2210 AD. Strictly speaking, Risk 2210 AD is not needed to play War of the Fanboys, but I recommend buying the game and using its pieces and dice. The plastic figures are high quality and the perfect size to work well with WotF. WotF utilizes the games “MODs” as Fanboys, its space stations as Castles, and its energy as Coins. If you’re on a budget, the figures can be replaced with coins, but chances are that if you enjoy War of the Fanboys, you’ll love Risk 2210 AD, also.
•Tape: You’ll want clear tape, ½” wide. Thicker tape will be too wide for some of the Heroes.
•Cardboard: Nothing fancy, cut the flaps off of some old boxes. I recommend getting at least one thick piece and one thin piece.

Rulebook:

War of the Fanboys can be a complex game at times. I recommend printing out the rulebook from either the downloads or rules page and keeping it handy to reference while you play.

Tokens:

Grab the Token Sheet from the downloads page and print it out. Printouts should be in color, but for these photos, all of my printouts were in black and white. You’ll also probably want to print out the tokens as their actual size, without any scaling.

Step 1) Rough out each of the tokens and a cardboard backing. For the tokens, I use a thinner cardboard.
Step 1) Rough out each of the tokens and a cardboard backing. For the tokens, I use a thinner cardboard.


Step 2) Pinch the paper printout and cardboard together and cut one edge flush. Apply a piece of tape to the edge, running over on either side, and fold it over to the cardboard.
Step 2) Pinch the paper printout and cardboard together and cut one edge flush. Apply a piece of tape to the edge, running over on either side, and fold it over to the cardboard.


Step 3) Cut the opposite edge flush and apply a second piece of tape in the same fashion as Step 2.
Step 3) Cut the opposite edge flush and apply a second piece of tape in the same fashion as Step 2.


Step 4) Cut off the rough sides and trailing tape. The result should be a nice looking token. Repeat steps for all 8 tokens.
Step 4) Cut off the rough sides and trailing tape. The result should be a nice looking token. Repeat steps for all 8 tokens.


Heroes:

Grab the Hero Sheets from the download page. There are two Hero Sheets, one with 8- and 16-bit sprites for Fanboys who prefer retro games, and one with 3d models for Fanboys who love the newest iterations of their Heroes. Print out whichever sheet you like. Printouts should be in color, but for these photos, all of my printouts were in black and white. I think I misjudged the size of the Hero pieces, so for the printout, players may want to blow up the sheet to full page. This will create larger Hero pieces that are easier to work with. For the Heroes, a heavier cardboard works best because the Heroes stand better.

Step 1) Cut out strips of cardboard ~½” wide.
Step 1) Cut out strips of cardboard ~½” wide.


Step 2) Cut the strips into sections between 1-1¼”. The skinnier Heroes will look better on the skinnier sections.
Step 2) Cut the strips into sections between 1-1¼”. The skinnier Heroes will look better on the skinnier sections.


Step 3) Cut the Heroes out flush and fold them in half so that an image of the Hero is visible on either side.
Step 3) Cut the Heroes out flush and fold them in half so that an image of the Hero is visible on either side.


Step 4) Lay the folded Hero flat against the cardboard so that the edge is at the center. Stick it to the cardboard with tape.
Step 4) Lay the folded Hero flat against the cardboard so that the edge is at the center. Stick it to the cardboard with tape.


Step 5) Wrap the tape around the bottom and back up the other side. When you get to the Hero, fold it back along the edge that is already taped, and run the tape up its untaped side.
Step 5) Wrap the tape around the bottom and back up the other side. When you get to the Hero, fold it back along the edge that is already taped, and run the tape up its untaped side.


Step 6) Straighten the Hero and stand it up. They’re pretty sturdy; mine have lasted over 7 years, even though they’re kept in Ziploc bags filled with plastic pieces.
Step 6) Straighten the Hero and stand it up. They’re pretty sturdy; mine have lasted over 7 years, even though they’re kept in Ziploc bags filled with plastic pieces.


Boards:

The boards can be downloaded in PNG form from the downloads section. Unfortunately, you’re on your own for getting the main board printed out. I tried finding some applications that would split it up and print it on 8.5x11” pages, but everyone I tried crashed as soon as I loaded the PNG. The only option is to take it somewhere that has an industrial printer and print it on 28x22” posterboard. I got mine printed on a glossy paper and I couldn’t have been happier with the results. I also printed out the Zebes and Great Fox boards from the industrial printer so the quality would match. This actually worked well, because the Zebes and Great Fox boards are actually 8.5x11”, so a typical printer would have to scale it down to account for margins.

Cards:

Now this is the tricky part. For printing the cards, I highly recommend downloading the Print Sheets, which are Microsoft Publisher files. If you don’t have Microsoft Publisher installed, you can install a trial version of Office Professional 2010.

The Publisher files provide 2 advantages. The first, it arranges the cards on the page in the highest density possible, while still maintaining adequate margins. Most print shops charge per page and the Print Sheets fit all 142 cards on 18 pages.


Second, the Print Sheets arrange the cards to one one-thousandth of an inch. Why is this important? When printing duplex, or when manually flipping pages in a paper tray for printers without duplex capabilities, the paper is not fed through in exactly the same place. What this means is that when printing the cards, the front images may not perfectly line up with the back images. This is a mechanical issue, and unfortunately, every printer I’ve used so far drifts the image some. By manually setting the absolute X and Y positions of each image on the Publisher layouts, any intolerance on the software end is eliminated.


If you don’t have the best printer, the card borders do allow for a slight mechanical error. On my first prints, I used a thicker, cardstock-type paper because I wanted heavy, sturdy cards. Oddly, the prints lined up better on the thinner paper. I don’t have a photo, but if you held the cardstock up to the light, the images on the reverse side looked like they created a drop shadow for the images facing me.

Now that you’ve got the cards printed out, the next step is to cut them out. I recommend using a paper guillotine for this. You can find one for about 30 dollars on Amazon, but if you’re on a budget, a steady hand and a pair of scissors or a razor and straight edge can suffice. The important thing is to cut the images flush, especially the backsides. You do not want any cards with white border showing around the back image. If that happens, it is very easy to recognize the card when it’s in the draw pile.

Last is the lamination. Like the printouts, you can get this done at a printshop, or you can do it at home. A laminator can be found on Amazon from about 30-50 USD. The key here is to use 5mil lamination sheets. The 5mil produces a heavy, sturdy card to compensate for the thin paper.

Arrange the cut-out cards on the lamination pages in a similar fashion to their layout on the Publisher files and run them through the laminator. They don’t have to be perfectly parallel with one another, because you can rough out the cards (slightly) before cutting the cards to perfect square. Accept the fact immediately that the cards aren’t all going to be perfectly sized, but with a tool like the paper guillotine, a person can do a great job. When trimming the lamination, you can get very close to the cards, but it’s important not to “breach” the paper. The lamination needs to maintain a border around the card. Otherwise, the lamination’s seal will be broken, and the top and bottom sheets of lamination will pull apart, splitting the paper. As seen in the picture below, you can cut the lamination pretty close without issue.


Optional:


•Plexiglas: depending on the material, printing a posterboard can be on the pricey side, so you’ll want to protect it from Mountain Dew spills and cat hair. I got a piece cut to size from Lowes measuring 38x24” for about $25. It fits perfectly over all three boards.
Super Mario Galaxy Orginal Soundtrack. Or, any soundtrack from your favorite Nintendo game. Nothing sets the mood for War of the Fanboys like listening to some of the old classics.